Capstone hosts Batten Disease charity day

Capstone hosts Batten Disease charity day

The first annual Capstone Global Markets charity say will be held on 1 October to support research focused on finding a cure to Batten Disease, a rare but fatal neurodegenerative disorder affecting children. 

The boutique derivatives broker dealer has committed to donating 100 per cent of its net commissions that day to The Jasper Against Batten Fund. 

The newly created annual event is part of Capstone’s commitment to giving back to the global community regardless of the macro financial environment. Every year, Capstone Global Markets will select specific charities to donate to, each with the common goal of helping children.
 
Jasper Duinstra is a four-year-old boy who was diagnosed with Batten Disease in March 2009, and has subsequently been experiencing seizures, deteriorating vision, limited vocabulary and paralysis in his legs. 

After the urgency of finding a cure for Batten Disease was brought to the attention of representatives of The New Jersey Nets, the basketball team committed to joining Capstone Global Markets on 1 October to raise money for the cause. The New Jersey Nets’ involvement at the fundraiser will be highlighted by the participation of Nets president Rod Thorn, general manager (and former New York Knicks player) Kiki Vandeweghe, the Nets dance team and the Nets mascot.
 
“We created this event to bring public awareness of this devastating disease and the urgency of Jasper’s need for support,” says Paul Britton, chief executive of Capstone Holdings Group. “We are pleased with the enthusiasm from our clients to join us in this mission to help Jasper and other children affected by Batten Disease. Capstone Global Markets is committed to helping charities dedicated to helping children.”
 
Batten Disease is a rare, fatal autosomal recessive inherited disease of the nervous system that begins in childhood. Symptoms of the disorder usually appear around ages four to ten, with the onset of a series of degenerative symptoms including seizures, vision impairment, deteriorating mental acuity and declining motor skills. Today, Batten Disease is always fatal. Scientists at Cornell University in New York are working on a gene therapy. 

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